Thread
#build-tools
    k

    Kenneth

    3 years ago
    Is there any good reason to use Gradle when you are used to Maven?
    a

    aandreyev

    3 years ago
    I have recently converted from maven to gradle. I wanted to use kotlin dsl in gradle and use kotlin in the project so i have the same language for everything. I would not say i benefit much though. When you search gradle examples - it is always groovy. And because gradle is still evolving fast - search results are full of deprecated groovy gradle scrips. There are too few code samples for gradle kotlin dsl unfortunately. The multiple ways of invoking plugins and managing dependencies with no consistant syntax in examples are confusing me in gradle. So if you dont need very recent versions of kotlin compiler or some special feature, you might prefer stick with maven.
    gildor

    gildor

    3 years ago
    Kotlin DSL is still in beta and not released, Gradle docs just recently updated (and not yet released, because part of Gradle 5.0 ) to Kotlin DSL so it’s kinda expecting thing to have Groovy only samples
    The multiple ways of invoking plugins
    Actually, there is only one recommended way, use plugins dsl
    managing dependencies with no consistant syntax
    not sure what you mean Actually, all those things covered in official migration guide:https://guides.gradle.org/migrating-build-logic-from-groovy-to-kotlin/ But in general, I of course agree, if you not familiar with Gradle (and don’t want to become familiar) use of Kotlin DSL for you will be hard at the moment and you can see advantages of Kotlin DSL now only if you advanced user and ready to use pre-release technology But you still can use Groovy configs, they never be deprecated and you can eventully migrate to Kotlin But, one thing. If you familiar with Maven and everything works for you, I don’t see why you should migrate. If you have a new project it’s more interesting choice, but still, maven officially supported by Kotlin
    a

    aandreyev

    3 years ago
    managing dependencies with no consistant syntax
    not sure what you mean
    @gildor i mean things like this
    compile group: 'ch.qos.logback', name: 'logback-classic', version: "1.2.3"
    
        implementation group: 'ch.qos.logback', name: 'logback-classic', version: "1.2.3"
        implementation('ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.2.3')
    
        implementation("ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.2.3")
    
        implementation(group = "ch.qos.logback", name = "logback-classic", version = "1.2.3")
    
        compile("ch.qos.logback:logback-classic:1.2.3")
    
        compile(group = "ch.qos.logback", name = "logback-classic", version = "1.2.3")
    i have 6 different ways (maybe more) to put the same thing i do not benefit much from that kind of flexibility
    plus the plugins like theese - yet another additional mechanism for dep management (intended to make things more clear and simple, i guess)
    dependencyManagement {
        imports {
            mavenBom 'com.amazonaws:aws-java-sdk-bom:1.11.228'
         }
        dependencies {
    if you are familiar with gradle best practicies - they are obvoius for you
    but if you are switching from maven - they just confuse
    gildor

    gildor

    3 years ago
    compile and implementation have nothing with consistency, just different configurations with own behavior of class path, in this case it is very similar to Maven dependency scope, no big difference there. Yeah, this is groovy too flexible in many situations
    And yeah, Gradle support short and long dependency definition, I suppose long one used to be more familiar for Maven users