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    Erik Christensen

    Erik Christensen

    2 years ago
    Just released version 0.2.3 of Island Time -- a multiplatform date and time library. There are some fancy new rounding operators, API tweaks, and a separate Kotlin 1.4-M3 build, but probably the biggest star of the release is a new project page with vastly expanded documentation, so check it out! https://islandtime.io
    j

    Joost Klitsie

    2 years ago
    Very cool, how does this compare to Klock library? Also do you have plans to make it for Javascript?
    Erik Christensen

    Erik Christensen

    2 years ago
    Island Time is a lot closer to the Java Time library in terms of design and generally more sophisticated. There's a PR someone submitted for JS support, but it still needs quite a bit of work. I've been focused a lot more on Android/iOS and expanding the overall feature set.
    j

    Joost Klitsie

    2 years ago
    Very cool! We do use the threeten library already, would love to see something similar for multiplatform (not saying that Klock is bad but threeten is enjoyable to use🙂 )
    s

    serebit

    2 years ago
    I still use Klock due to island-time lacking Linux x64 support-- any chance of this changing anytime soon?
    Erik Christensen

    Erik Christensen

    2 years ago
    If you submit a PR, sure! 😛 I've looked at the other platforms enough to get a general idea of what it would take to add them, but they just haven't been a priority. Linux is probably easier than JS overall since it's more similar to the existing Darwin implementation.
    s

    serebit

    2 years ago
    Late, but I wouldn't be opposed to submitting a PR for it.
    Erik Christensen

    Erik Christensen

    2 years ago
    The key piece is implementing the
    TimeZoneRulesProvider
    . At least some of the other parts can be copied from Darwin and anything related to locale can probably be ignored -- at least initially. A time zone database is included in most Linux distributions, but there's some variation. Howard Hinnant's date library, which is the foundation for the new C++20 chrono APIs, can take care of loading the OS TZDB and handles a lot of the idiosyncrasies, so exposing parts of it in a C API using cinterop might be the easiest way to go. Anyway, feel free to message me if you have any questions or decide to pursue it!