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# random
r

rtsketo

02/22/2023, 8:48 AM
Completely random, but I thought I'd finally ask (since Google didn't yield any results for me just now). I've been an Android developer for three years and I keep declaring on the functions I create that the Int parameter is in fact a @ColorInt (for example
fun View.background(@ColorInt color: Int) = ...
) expecting that if someone passes a variable that isn't annotated with the same annotation (
val someColor = Color.parse("#C0FF33"); someView.background(someColor)
) an error will be produced. I've never seen so far such an error, not even for Android SDK's functions like `setColorText(..)`that are also annotated like so. Was having an error or a warning a false expectation of mine? If so, what is even the annotation supposed to do?
t

thanksforallthefish

02/22/2023, 9:32 AM
I am not an Android dev, but I copied your exact question into chatGPT. here what it says:
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The @ColorInt annotation is used to indicate that an integer value represents a color and is intended to help catch potential bugs or inconsistencies in the usage of color values in Android code. It is part of the Android Support Annotations library, which provides a set of annotations for developers to use in their Android code to improve code quality and help detect potential issues at compile time.

However, the @ColorInt annotation alone does not guarantee that a variable contains a valid color value or that the value passed to a function is in fact a color value. It is up to the developer to ensure that the value being passed to the function is indeed a color value.

The main purpose of the @ColorInt annotation is to help lint tools and other code analysis tools to detect potential issues with color values. Lint is a static code analysis tool that is part of the Android build system, and it can detect issues like passing an invalid color value to a function that expects a color value.

In your case, it's possible that the lint checks for the @ColorInt annotation are not enabled in your Android project or that the color values you are passing to the function are not being analyzed by lint for some reason. It's also possible that the @ColorInt annotation is not being enforced in some of the Android SDK's functions, but this would be a question for the Android platform developers.

In summary, the @ColorInt annotation is a useful tool to help catch potential issues with color values in Android code, but it is not a foolproof way to ensure that color values are used correctly. It's still up to the developer to ensure that the values being used are valid and consistent.
likes to talk a lot 😄
r

rtsketo

02/22/2023, 9:48 AM
Ask it how to lint @ColorInt errors 😜
t

thanksforallthefish

02/22/2023, 9:51 AM
here it is To lint
@ColorInt
errors, you can use the Android Lint tool, which is included in the Android SDK. Lint is a static code analysis tool that can check your Android code for a variety of issues, including issues related to the use of color values. To enable the
@ColorInt
check in your Android project, you can add the following lint configuration to your project’s build.gradle file:
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perl

android { lintOptions { check "NewApi", "ResourceType", "ValidFragment", "MissingTranslation", "UnusedResources", "@ColorInt" } }
This configuration tells lint to check for the
@ColorInt
annotation and report any issues it finds. To run lint on your project, you can use the following command in the terminal:
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bash

./gradlew lint
This command will run lint on your project and generate a report of any issues it finds, including issues related to the use of color values. If you are using Android Studio, you can also run lint from the IDE by selecting “Analyze” -> “Inspect Code” from the menu. This will run lint on your project and display any issues it finds in the “Inspection Results” window. By enabling the
@ColorInt
check in your lint configuration, you can catch potential issues related to the use of color values in your Android code and ensure that your code is more robust and less error-prone.
e

ephemient

02/22/2023, 12:18 PM
so confident and so wrong
t

thanksforallthefish

02/22/2023, 12:18 PM
yeah, I have my doubts chatGPT is a reasonable tool at this point in time
k

Klitos Kyriacou

02/22/2023, 12:22 PM
There's another AI tool that looks promising as it includes proper references: https://www.perplexity.ai/?s=u&uuid=7cfb8fd9-164b-4442-8c3a-d1f7cd1f685f
☝🏼 1
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